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Chapter 14: Team Building

With good team-building skills, you can unite employees around a common goal and generate greater productivity. Without them, you limit yourself and the staff to the effort each individual can make alone.

Team building is an ongoing process that helps a work group evolve into a cohesive unit. The team members not only share expectations for accomplishing group tasks, but trust and support one another and respect one another's individual differences. Your role as a team builder is to lead your team toward cohesiveness and productivity. A team takes on a life of its own and you have to regularly nurture and maintain it, just as you do for individual employees. Your Development & Training Organization Development Consultant can advise and help you.

Managing diversity well can enhance team-building; Chapter 12, Managing Diversity in the Workplace, offers information and resources in this important area.


Guiding Principles

Team building can lead to:

Other Resources

  • Organization Development Specialists in Development & Training 

    Sausan Fahmy

    Joseph Dos Ramos - 6-4278

     

  • Steps to Building an Effective Team

    The first rule of team building is an obvious one: to lead a team effectively, you must first establish your leadership with each team member. Remember that the most effective team leaders build their relationships of trust and loyalty, rather than fear or the power of their positions.

    Symptoms that Signal a Need for Team Building

  • Decreased productivity
  • Conflicts or hostility among staff members
  • Confusion about assignments, missed signals, and unclear relationships
  • Decisions misunderstood or not carried through properly
  • Apathy and lack of involvement
  • Lack of initiation, imagination, innovation; routine actions taken for solving complex problems
  • Complaints of discrimination or favoritism
  • Ineffective staff meetings, low participation, minimally effective decisions
  • Negative reactions to the manager
  • Complaints about quality of service